Differentiating the Ebola Virus from the E Virus

20140730-224657-82017589.jpg

I’ve seen and heard a lot about Ebola on the news lately, especially as the latest Ebola outbreak reaches epic proportions within western parts of Africa.

I’ve been following Ebola since the early days. I saw the early warning signs back in February of this year as the headlines gripped me. So much so, that I took it upon myself to write my own novel based on the killer disease which I named E Virus: The Diary of a Modern Day Girl.

Ebola first grabbed my attention, as I instantly pictured it as the start of a Zombie Apocalypse. For me, the way the virus spread and the devastation it causes took me right back to the first Resident Evil film, where the T Virus reigned supreme.

It gave me the inspiration to write my own story, in my own unique way. I created zombies that had never been seen before. They advanced and evolved and even adapted to their surroundings. I used inspiration from the animal kingdom, and created a new race of the infected.

FACT: Ebola can only be transmitted through direct contact with the blood or bodily fluids of the infected.

This was the big one for me. As all my fellow zombie enthusiasts will know, the only way to become a zombie is to get bitten. Those familiar with Danny Boyles work, I ask to cast their minds to 28 weeks later, the infection started to spread in this particular film from the sharing of saliva. In other words, direct contact with the infected.

FACT: Ebola symptoms include internal and external bleeding

Again, a popular trait well known within the zombie community. All you have to do is google the word “Zombie” to understand my references. Most zombies, or infected, whatever it is you prefer to call them tend to be laced with rotting flesh and sores bulging out from open wounds, pus oozing out their blood ridden features. Overall not a pretty sight. But nearly all zombies seem to possess the same trait. Don’t they?

E Virus The Beginning of the End

FACT: The Ebola incubation period is 2-21 days

It takes a mere two days for the virus to infect the host and 7-21 days for the host to completely succumb to the virus. Ebola has a 90% fatality rate. Need I say more?

All in all, these are some of the many reasons as to why Ebola is not only a terrifying virus, but it is also a fast acting, deadly disease which has more than enough power to push humanity to the edge of extinction.

As unlikely as it is that Ebola will bring the dead back to life, it doesn’t make this disease any less serious. So stay vigilant, if you feel you are developing any symptoms related to Ebola, seek medical attention immediately.

For more information related to the Ebola Virus check out the sites listed below.

WHO (World Health Organisation)

CDC (Centres for Disease Control and Prevention)

BBC News

To purchase your copy of E Virus: The Diary of a Modern Day Girl CLICK HERE

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s